How to Maintain Fitness and Wellness Habits: Tips and Techniques

How to Maintain Fitness and Wellness Habits: Tips and Techniques

Maintaining your fitness and wellness habits can be challenging, especially when life gets
busy. However, developing simple and effective strategies will help you stay on track and
keep your health a priority. This article will provide you with a comprehensive guide to
staying fit and healthy, complete with tips and techniques that you can implement in your
daily routine.

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Tribute #6 – Jessica Crate

Tribute #6 – Jessica Crate

It was apparent this was coming, right?  This woman was all over my Rock ‘n’ Roll recap, so the JC1inspiration was already foreshadowed and if you didn’t read the last post, then prepare to be inspired.

Jessica and I met on a set of commercial we were doing for some insurance company.  I never actual saw the final cut, but then again, that happens quite frequently.  We were actually placed in the roles of runners, which is why it made so much sense.  I was in a conversation about running and all of the sudden, I heard this upbeat, sultry voice from behind me enter into the conversation.  I turned around to see this tall, athletically thin, beautiful blond woman behind me.  Her hair in a ponytail, wearing a Newton visor and radiating the intense positive aura all around her.  There was more to this attraction then the minimalistic pure blood American male to the tall, stunningly gorgeous, platinum blond female(See? I am not denying the obvious).  The energy radiating from this woman was intense.

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We conversed in detail all the while waiting for the lighting to be rigged, and shots set up.  I came to find her life as intoxicating as Jessica herself.  This woman is an Elite Runner holding course records in the Gasparilla Half-Marathon, St. Pete Women’s Half-Marathon and the St. Pete Rock ‘n’ Roll Half-Marathon.  As of last year she began competing in triathlon only to make it to Las Vegas for the 70.3 World Championships her first year.  If that wasn’t enough, she also coaches other elite athletes, has her own marketing company, and recently created her own Not-for-profit.  She is committed to giving back.

As I have continued to attempt climb inside her head and soul to try and understand what drives her, I have yet to hear her utter a negative word about anything or anyone.  She truly believes in winning not only the race, but in life itself.  If there is ever the opportunity to meet this unbelievable athlete and woman, do so.  Before you know it, you will be winning to.  Let me introduce you to my good friend, Jessica Crate.

Jessica Crate

Birthdate/Sign:  07/25/1985, Leojc10
Place of Birth: Victoria, British Columbia CANADA
Place growing up: Lived all over the US…. Oregon, California, Wisconsin, NY during Elementary School years.
High School: Sarnia, Ontario CANADA
High School sports: EVERYTHING! Lol…. I think I tried out for and was on every team! Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Softball, Gymnastics, Swimming, Dance, Cheerleading, Track & Field, Cross-country, I even dabbled in Girls Rugby (big mistake-haha).
College: Arizona State for 2 years studying Exercise Science and Kinesiology and was Academic and Varsity Scholar athlete for Track and XC(Cross Country) both years.
College Sports:  Track and XC, but also dabbled in Soccer, Yoga, Strength training and swimming.Transferred to Florida State University for my last 2 years to pursue Pre- Medical Studies and continued my Minors in Psychology and French. Also ran on the Varsity Track and XC Teams and made it to National Championships all 4 collegiate years. ūüôā
Other Sports:  I currently work out 2-3 times daily and mix up my training with cycling, running, swimming, yoga, P90X, SUP (stand up paddleboarding), surfing, adventure/mud racing, volleyball, waterskiing, snowboarding…. You name it!

 

When was it you started competing and why?
I was born a competitor and my Mom tells me I literally came into this world “running” as I was born 1 month pre-mature. Clearly I was eager to get moving at an early age ūüėČ
I grew up in a very athletic family, so “friendly competition” has been a part of my life since my early years. I love to win and have a burning desire for change for the better. Thus, I’m always looking to improve and hone my skills.

 

What is it that keeps you running after all of this time?
I absolutely LOVE a challenge, I love growing, running is a part of me, and a HUGE part of my life, friendships, relationships and what I do. Others inspire me to KEEP running and in return I hope to inspire others in the process.

 

In our private conversations you have basically told me that this year you have decided to give back.   How did that come about?
 I have been overseas on several missions trips and have had the privilege of traveling the JC7world for racing, training and competing. Being awarded a full-ride scholarship to two D1 Schools for both athletics and academics was not only a blessing, but I felt it a responsibility to essentially “Give Back” all that had been given to me. Upon graduating from college, I partnered with Olympic athlete, Jon Rankin, to launch our own Non-profit organization entitled “Giving Athletics, Inc”, who’s mission is to “Inspire Social change through athletic participation.” It has been so rewarding to help others by fitting them with clothes and shoes that allow them to participate in sports and gain an education. ūüôā

 

If you could give me one adjective to describe the feeling you get when you are working what would it be?
Exhilaration, FREEDOM, accomplishment, energy!

 

When and why did you start competing in triathlon?
Back in April 2011, I had been training hard to qualify for the Olympic Trials in the Marathon. I JC3had raced several marathons already, but my coach believed I was ready based on my workouts and marathon times. However, at mile 14, I side- stepped around some runners at a water station and snapped my foot. The adrenaline, high pain tolerance and my will to finish wouldn’t let me quit, so I ran the last 12.2 miles on a broken foot. I requalified for Boston, but obviously did more damage to my foot by continuing the race. My Olympic Trials dreams were shattered and I was now in a boot, unable to run. I began physical therapy and realized that I was going to go crazy if I couldn’t run, so I picked up swimming and cycling. Long story short, I started sprint triathlons, qualified for USAT Age Group Nationals in the ITU distance and soon I was embarking on tri training. I ended up qualifying for the USAT ITU World Championships and setting new goals, like Ironman 70.3. Now, here I am! Runner turned Triathlete ūüėČ

 

What projects are involved with besides running races?
I currently own a marketing company “CRATE, Inc.”, coach and train athletes in addition to my training, while working with a neutraceutical company, LifeVantage. I have found my purpose and passion in life and live to lead a legacy by coaching, training and inspiring others to achieve their goals and dreams.

 

What would you say is your greatest obstacle  you ever overcameJC9
Breaking my foot in the Boston marathon, overcoming that injury and breaking onto the triathlon scene to qualify for 2 World Championships last year as well as set 3 course records in half marathons throughout the state of Florida.

 

What is your greatest victory?
My greatest victory is overcoming so many failures to continue succeeding. I firmly believe, and as the most successful people will tell you, you have to fail FORWARD. The faster you fail, the quicker you’ll succeed.

 

What are you favorite quotes?
My business partners and teammates know my favorite slogans, amongst many “Jessica-isms” are: “K.I.S.S.” (Keep it simple silly), “Relax, Smile and Breathe”, “Live life to the fullest”, “Go BIG or go home!”

 

If you’d like more information on where she will be next or to sign up for a training session, contact her at [email protected]

Or visit her website: www.jessicacrate.com

Carpe Viam!

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Jessica and the Goof

Psychology of the End – Stunning Sunday

Notice the title of this blog is not Psychology of the finish which I could probably write another full posting on. ¬†This is “the end”, because within this life we have a number of endings. ¬†Some of them open new doors, some of them just mean we have more to go. ¬†In triathlon, we end each event just to start another one. ¬†I have noticed a few things about myself that I need to overcome and maybe they may just be similar to what you may be going through. ¬†Some of the tips and tricks I have learned may help, and if they do great, if not you have another tool in your bag to pay it forward to others.

The idea for this posting hits me every time I am in the pool. ¬†As I stated numerous times in early posts, I am not a good swimmer by any means. ¬†I try though. ¬†What I notice is when I am in the pool, I speed up a bit when I see the wall coming up. ¬†I end up a little more winded than planned and I stop after 100 m. ¬†Interesting enough, I do make my turn at 50m, but the 100m wall I want to stop. ¬†This is what I reference as the end, not the finish. ¬†In the beginning of the workout I have many more laps to do, but I end up grabbing an extra breath and a few seconds of rest at each 100m turn. ¬†I know it psychological, because in open water I can just keep going. ¬†Do I change strokes¬†occasionally¬†to check the distance on my watch? Sure, but I continue on in just a few¬†seconds. ¬†So why the difference? ¬†Is it discipline? ¬†Yes, that’s part of it, but it is also, the idea that the wall is right there seems to put the idea in my head that it is the end, so automatically speed up and my breathing changes. ¬†Obviously, this is probably not a common problem because I see a lot of triathletes swim lap after lap after lap.

Swimming isn’t the only event where the psychosis of the end comes into play. ¬†Have you ever gone out on a run knowing you are going to do six miles and at the end you are exhausted even though you might have run conquered much longer distances? ¬†I personally see the end of the workout and something kicks in and I am ready to stop for at least that portion of the session. ¬†I am ¬†not talking about a tempo run or a track workout. ¬†I am talking about just your basic run workout. ¬†Different workouts obviously dictate different intensity. ¬†For example, a 6 mile tempo run will require and higher intensity level then a long slow distance run, just as a track workout has a higher intensity level than even a tempo run.

The question is how can this obstacle of the end be broken?  I have started coming up with a few ways to break through the end in order to keep going in the pool, do the optional mile after a hard track workout or even do that insurmountable transition run after a long hard bike session.

1) Swim – Learn to do flip turns if you don’t already know. ¬†My last workout I started to incorporate flip turns. ¬†I still am learning how to do them correctly, but because I took my 1000m continuous swim to learn to do them, the wall became an opportunity to practice the flip turn, and the 50m swim became the time I assessed how I did, and what I needed to make them better.

2) Run – there are three ways I usually get through this:

  • The optional mile becomes not optional
  • Fake it – no matter how slow you end up going do not worry just get it done and after a while your body will learn to expect it
  • Give yourself a little extra time for recovery. ¬†In our speed workouts the coach gives us a pre-determined amount of recovery prior to the optional mile. ¬†Sometimes I need more, so I take it and then run the extra mile on my own. ¬†

3) Bike-to-Run Transition run – I have only found one real way to get through this myself. ¬†Have your running shoes (and socks) ready to go when you get back and in full eyesight when you either open the car or even pull up. ¬†My friend Nick sometimes trusts his shoes right under his car so he can hang his bike and go. ¬†If you trust that they will still be there this is the best way. ¬†When I personally see my shoes there ready and waiting, I would feel guilty if I didn’t run. ¬†Of course guilt is a more negative emotion, but sometimes the negative emotion can be used for a¬†positive¬†outcome. ¬†In my experience, if I decide to wait, I usually end up cooling down and I just have no desire to run. ¬†If I jump into my shoes and start the run, I feel like I am already running might as well work it the best I can.

In life I have had numerous endings that have also opened new doors to experiences that I would not have had if I didn’t recognize it. ¬†The end of my military career brought me to the corporate world where I have been succeeding. ¬†I had the choice to either stay in the military and continue my career or leave and start another one. ¬†I may have never started on this journey into endurance running and triathlon if I didn’t move on from the military. ¬†At the same time I have been offered numerous times after I finish a project to stay at the same location. ¬†Almost every time I have decided to move on and my following project has always given me the opportunity to learn something new.

In each of our lives there are “ends” to experiences, jobs, education, friendships etc. ¬†I believe the secret lies in recognizing whether it is actually an end or a finish.

Carpe Viam!